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Keeping Rain from the Drain

Jessica T. R. Brown, NOAA’s Georgia Sea Grant in Brunswick, GA Have you ever wondered where the rain goes once it hits the ground? Rainwater that falls on a surface that can’t absorb it is called stormwater. Scientists and engineers try to mimic nature to catch rainwater where it falls by using plants, soil, and…

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Algal Blooms: Signs of Spring and Signs of Trouble

Rose Masui, NOAA’s Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Kachemak Bay, AK Join us to learn about how estuaries wake up in the spring, with warming waters and nutrients fueling blooms of phytoplankton in Alaskan coastal waters. We will talk about how marine plants are the primary producers in our coastal food webs, and…

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Get Your Feet Muddy at the Waquoit Bay Reserve!

Tonna-Marie Rogers, NOAA’s Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Falmouth, MA Come along as we explore the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (WBNERR) on Cape Cod, MA. Walk (virtually) with us into the shallow bay to visit experiment sites, explore the salt marsh, observe osprey and bay creatures, and wade into water sampling…

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Hitching a Ride: How to Spot and Stop Marine Invasive Species

Jasmine Maurer from NOAA’s Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Kachemak Bay, AK   How do invasive and exotic marine species arrive and spread in Alaska? We will talk about how to monitor and identify European green crab and tunicates, how they affect ecosystems, and what actions to take before the summer season to…

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It’s Not Easy Being Shelled: The Ocean Acidification Blues

Meg Chadsey, NOAA’s Washington Sea Grant and the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle, WA Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) isn’t just warming the planet; it’s also reacting with seawater and making the oceans more corrosive—a process known as ocean acidification. This slight increase in acidity doesn’t change the way the ocean looks or feels…

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Talking Trash: Marine Debris Research in Alaska

Peter Murphy, NOAA’s Marine Debris Program in Seattle, WA With Alaska’s extensive, rugged and remote coastline, longer than the rest of the United States combined, innovative and creative approaches are required to address marine debris. Join us to learn about types of marine debris of all shapes and sizes, as well as projects that are…

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Carbon’s Journey and Our Warming Planet

Frank Niepold and Tom Di Liberto, NOAA’s Climate Program Office in Silver Spring, MD The carbon cycle is a process where carbon dioxide travels from the atmosphere into living organisms and the Earth, then back into the atmosphere. Learn how changes in carbon dioxide levels, such as burning fossil fuels (oil, gas, etc.), affect the…

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Swimming in Dirty Water – Pollution and Fish Health

Cathy Laetz, NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA Every day humans produce tons of chemicals that can drain into our rivers, lakes, and oceans. In the Pacific Northwest, these waters are important habitat for fish like salmon. You wouldn’t like to swim at a polluted beach and our science tells us that the…

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The Job of a NOAA Oil Spill Response Scientist

Gary Shigenaka and Charlie Henry, both of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration in Seattle, WA and Mobile, AL NOAA scientists respond to more than 150 oil spills every year. It is their job to provide the best available science that guides emergency response decision making. April 2020 marked the 10 year anniversary of the…

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Alaska Week: Talking Trash

Peter Murphy, NOAA’s Marine Debris Program Alaska Regional Coordinator in Seattle, WA When you think of Alaska, you may think of bears, snow-capped peaks, and stunning glaciers (or just “home”). You can find all of that in Alaska, but also a whole lot of marine debris from all over the world. The same things that…

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